Lawrence Lerner

 

ABOUT ME

I’m a New York City–based editor, reporter and photographer with extensive experience leading editorial teams and producing stories across a full spectrum of traditional and digital media, including magazines, newspapers, public radio and the web. I’ve also doubled as a communications manager in university, government and nonprofit settings, developing/implementing internal and external communications plans; setting editorial agendas to advance key organizational goals; and promoting stories through social media, video and other channels to enhance brand awareness.

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As a journalist I’ve written, edited or produced for The Christian Science Monitor, PRI’s “The Takeaway” (on NPR affiliate WNYC), TimeOut New York, Harper’s, Wired, Rolling Stone and many other media outlets—and led an award-winning community newspaper on the West Side of Manhattan called Chelsea Now, breaking stories that fueled major reforms. My communications work includes stints with FEMA, V-Day Men and Rutgers University–Newark (my current gig).

Along the way I’ve produced stories on politics, immigration, labor, affordable housing, real estate, education, race/ethnicity, LGBT issues, science, arts/culture, human rights and the environment. I also shoot images for many of my stories, along with photo essays. For all the gory details, please see my CV.

 

  

WATER TOWERS OF NYC

and other photo essays

 
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PHOTOGRAPHY

< CLICK ON IMAGE FOR GALLERY >

 

E D I T O R I A L 

 
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RUTGERS UNIVERSITY–newark

As Assistant Director of Editorial/Media for the College of Arts & Sciences (2011–present), I built a communications plan from scratch, implemented it across multiple platforms, and created a cohesive visual identity and messaging strategy that helped the school’s visibility and fundraising soar. 

 
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CHELSEA NOW newspaper

As Editor (2006–2008), I launched this award-winning community newspaper on the West Side of Manhattan, put it on the NYC media map, and broke stories that fueled reforms on major issues while making the paper a must-read for area residents and politicians.